Benefits Of Wellness Services

Benefits Of LQT’s Wellness Services

Discover The Benefits Of All LQT’s Wellness Services!

BENEFITS OF WELLNESS SERVICES

Physical Benefits Of Massage Therapy

Aids In Overall Weight Loss

Builds Immunity

Decreases Illness Related Fatigue

Improves Posture

Improves Deep Breathing

Improves Full Body Circulation

Improves Skin Tone

Improves Skin Health

Improves Joint Flexibility

Improves ROM (Range Of Motion) & Mobility

Improves Muscle Tone

Increases Endorphin Secretion (The Body’s Natural Painkillers)

Lowers Blood Pressure

Promotes Digestion

Promotes Better Sleep

Reduces Body Aches & Pains

Relieves Muscle Soreness, Tension, Spasms, And Stiffness

 

Mental Benefits Of Massage Therapy

Improves Self-Awareness

Improves Mental Alertness

Improves Capacity For Calm Thinking

Improves Body-Mind Connection

Improves Concentration

Encourages/Fosters Peace Of Mind

Encourages/Fosters A Feeling Of Well-Being

Positively Affects Hyper-Deficit Hyperactivity

Positively Affects Post-Traumatic Stress

Relieves Mental Stress

 

Emotional Benefits Of Massage Therapy 

Creation Of New Neural Pathways In The Brain By Releasing Old Muscle/Emotional Habits, Patterns, And Trauma

Decreases Depression

Decreases Anxiety

Grief Work

Improves Anger Management

Increase & Unblock Energy

Regulation Of Respiratory And Nervous Systems

Release Emotional Muscle Memories

Re-Write Old Emotional Patterns

 

Diseases/Ailments/Conditions Which Are Affected Positively By Massage Therapy

Achilles Tendonitis

AIDS

Allergies

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis a.k.a. Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS)

Anxiety

Arm Ache/Pain

Asthma

Bad Posture

Blood Circulation

Bronchitis

Bunions

Bursitis

Cancer

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic Lung Disease

Chronic Pain

Circulatory Issues

Claw Toes

Constipation

Depression

Diabetes

Diarrhea

Digestive Disorders

Dislocations

Edema

Eyestrain

False Sciatica

Fibromyalgia

Foot Ache/Pain

Fractures

Frozen Shoulder

Functional Sclerosis

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Golfer’s Elbow

Hand Ache/Pain

Headache/Head Pain

High Blood Pressure

Hip Ache/Pain

Immune System Functions

Insomnia

Joint Mobility

Knee Ache/Pain

Kyphosis

Lateral Epicondylitis

Leg Ache/Pain

Low-Back Ache/Pain

Low Blood Pressure

Lyme Disease

Lymph Circulation

Mallet Toes

Medial Epicondylitis

Mental Awareness

Mid-Back Ache/Pain

Migraines

Mind-Body Connection

Multiple Sclerosis

Muscle Spasms

Myofascial Ache/Pain

Neck Ache/Pain

Numbness

Osteoporosis

Parkinson’s Disease

Plantar Fasciitis

Poor Diet

Post-Surgical Rehabilitation

Postural Distortions

Pregnancy

Psycho-emotional Distress

Range Of Motion (ROM)

Rotator Cuff Syndrome

Scar Tissue Formation

Sciatica

Scoliosis

Shin Splints

Shoulder Ache/Pain

Sleeping Disorders

Spastic Colon

Sports Injuries

Sprains

Strains

Stress

Stroke

TemperoMandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMJ)

Tendonitis

Tennis Elbow

Tension Headache/Pain

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Tingling

Toxin Removal

Trigger Finger

Trigger Points

Tumors

Ulnar Neuritis

Upper Back Ache/Pain

Whiplash

 

What You Can Expect During Your Massage Therapeutic Session 

You do not need any special preparations before you get your massage. Before a massage therapy session starts, your massage therapist should ask you about any symptoms, your medical history and what you’re hoping to get out of massage. Your massage therapist may also quickly explain the kind of massage or techniques he/she will use, if asked. In a typical massage therapy session, you undress or wear loose-fitting clothing. Undress only to the point that you’re comfortable. You generally lie on a table and cover yourself with a sheet. You can also have a massage while sitting in a chair, fully clothed. Your massage therapist may perform an evaluation through touch to locate painful or tense areas and to determine how much pressure to apply. Depending on preference, your massage therapist may use oil or lotion to reduce friction on your skin. (Please share with your massage therapist if you might be allergic to any specific ingredients.) A massage session may last from 30 to 120 minutes, depending on the type of massage and how much time you have. No matter what kind of massage you choose, you should feel calm and relaxed during and after your massage. If a massage therapist is pushing too hard, ask for lighter pressure. Occasionally you may have a sensitive spot in a muscle that feels like a knot. It’s likely to be uncomfortable while your massage therapist works it out. But if it becomes painful, please speak up.

**Some forms of massage can leave you feeling a bit sore the next day. But massage shouldn’t ordinarily be painful or uncomfortable. If any part of your massage doesn’t feel right or is painful, speak up right away. Most serious problems come from too much pressure during massage.

 

Massage Is NOT For Everyone 

Most people can benefit from massage. However, massage may not be appropriate if you have:

* Bleeding disorders or take blood-thinning medication

* Burns or healing wounds

* Deep vein thrombosis

* Fractures

* Severe osteoporosis

* Severe thrombocytopenia

Discuss the pros and cons of massage with your doctor, especially if you are pregnant or you have cancer or unexplained pain.